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ALL CARAVANS OF 2009 model year and after have 13-pin electrical plugs that will not connect to 12N and 12S car sockets. The solution is to remove the old sockets from the car and replace them with a single Euro socket. It is not a complicated job.

The new socket accommodates the existing 12N and 12S cables, and they are easy to connect. The trick is to ensure that every wire is fitted in the correct place and that all the new connections are secure and will stay that way.

ALL CARAVANS OF 2009 model year and after have 13-pin electrical plugs that will not connect to 12N and 12S car sockets. The solution is to remove the old sockets from the car and replace them with a single Euro socket. It is not a complicated job.

 

The new socket accommodates the existing 12N and 12S cables, and they are easy to connect. The trick is to ensure that every wire is fitted in the correct place and that all the new connections are secure and will stay that way.

 

The terminals on the 13-pin socket are clearly numbered. Simply connect the 12N and 12S cables as shown in the table below. When the new socket is wired in and the car battery has been reconnected, check the outputs. Preferably this should be done using a multimeter to confirm the circuits are correctly routed.

 

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1

It is a relatively easy task to swap your car’s old twin 12N and 12S sockets for the new European-style 13-pin single socket.

 

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2

You’ll need a Euro socket, mounting plate with three nuts, bolts and lockwashers, a basic tool kit and silicone sealant.

 

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3

Disconnect the car battery earth, cut cable ties from the towbar and unbolt the towball to release the socket mounting.

 

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4

Undo the 12N/S sockets’ bolts and dismantle them from the mounting plate. If they’ve rusted, you may need to cut them.

 

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5

Here, the 12N socket has been dismantled to reveal the cables and terminals. Dismantle the 12S in the same way.

 

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6

Release each of the wires from their screw terminals. Then slide the grommets and the mounting plate off the cables.

 

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7

Remove the pin connector from the Euro socket and straighten the wires of the 12N and 12S cables so they are ready to connect.

 

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8

Slide the Euro mounting plate over both cables, then cut the Euro socket’s grommet wide enough to allow both cables to pass through it.

 

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9

Remove the Euro connector terminal block from its socket casing. You will see that each terminal has been clearly numbered, from 1 to 13.

 

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10

Following the table at the bottom of this page, connect 12N wires to centre terminals 1-4, then 5 and 6. The 12S wires go to the outer ring.

 

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11

When all wires are securely connected, refit the Euro connector into its socket housing. It fits in only one way.

 

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12

Ensuring wires cannot be nipped, bolt the grommet and mount plate to the socket. Apply silicone sealant at cable exit.

 

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13

Bolt the mounting plate and Euro socket to the tow hitch and secure the cables with cable ties as required.

 

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14

The caravan’s Euro plug is a push-and-twist fit into the new socket. It is more secure, reliable and weatherproof than 12N/S.

 

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15

Reconnect the car battery earth lead. Then ensure that all of the caravan’s circuits are operating correctly.

 

Wiring chart

 

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Rory White

See other Advice articles filed in ‘Tow cars’ written by Rory White
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