Claudia Dowell
Features Editor

See other Advice articles filed in ‘Fixtures and fittings’ written by Claudia Dowell
   
SOME MONTHS AGO I had the chance to try out Al-Ko Kober’s new caravan mover, the Mammut, and was very impressed with it – especially the fact that it fits without any loss of ground clearance.

What my test didn’t reveal, however, was some other unique features which I only found out about when I visited AL-KO’s headquarters to see a Mammut being fitted to one of our long-term test caravans, a Coachman Amara 570/6.

SOME MONTHS AGO I had the chance to try out Al-Ko Kober’s new caravan mover, the Mammut, and was very impressed with it – especially the fact that it fits without any loss of ground clearance.

 

What my test didn’t reveal, however, was some other unique features which I only found out about when I visited AL-KO’s headquarters to see a Mammut being fitted to one of our long-term test caravans, a Coachman Amara 570/6.

 

The Mammut is designed to fit directly to any Al-Ko chassis manufactured from April 2010. These chassis have the mounting holes for the two drive units punched in them and are identified by the letter M stamped on them. The mover can be fitted to caravans with chassis made before April 2010 but require an additional crossbeam which mounts under the chassis members. However, the loss of ground clearance is still only 50mm – much less than with any other movers on the market.

 

Aftermarket fit

The major downside of the Mammut is its price – £1498 as an integral fit, and £1625 for an aftermarket fit. As a result, I suspect that Al-Ko will have a job competing with other models as far as the aftermarket is concerned and will not find it easy to break into the OEM market until such time as there is a twin axle version available. Currently only AS Caravans is fitting it as standard on its three models – all of which are single axle. When Al-Ko is able to offer a mover for twin axles, I am fairly certain that all the main manufacturers will think seriously about fitting Mammuts to their top ranges.

 

Fitting the Mammut to the Amara took about three hours, the job being done by Tom Kelly, one of Al-Ko’s service engineers. Having retro-fitted a number of movers over the years I was impressed at how easy the job was, even allowing for the fact that Tom was very experienced in doing it. I should perhaps point out at this juncture that the Mammut is not available for DIY retro-fitting, the job having to be done at one the company’s appointed dealers around the country.

 

Although Tom had the advantage of a lift, it isn’t an essential piece of equipment, the unit being easily fitted with the caravan on the ground.

 

Fitting a Mammut step-by-step

To see how the Mammut was fitted to the caravan, click here.

Share with friends

Follow us on

Most recent caravan reviews

The Practical Caravan Airstream Missouri review – 1 - It couldn't be anything else, could it? And Swift's UK-spec Airstreams are approved by the NCC and are CRiS registered, for owners’ peace of mind (© Phil Russell/Practical Caravan)
The Practical Caravan Swift Conqueror 480 review – 1 - The 2018 Conquerors get new graphics, as there are big changes across the Swift Group for the new season (© Phil Russell/Practical Caravan)
The Practical Caravan Lunar Lexon 660 review – 1 - The new-for-2018 Lunar Lexon 660 has an MTPLM of 1625kg (© Peter Baber/Practical Caravan)
The Practical Caravan 2018 Coachman VIP 575 review – 1 - A new aerodynamic bodyshell and graphics are just two improvements to the Coachman VIP range for the 2018 season (© Phil Russell/Practical Caravan)
The Practical Caravan Elddis Affinity 574 review – 1 - The exterior’s smart looks incorporate a new ABS front panel with grey gas locker, plus a glazed two-piece entrance door and alloy wheels (© Phil Russell/Practical Caravan)
The Practical Caravan 2018 Bailey Unicorn Cadiz review – 1 - All-new, full-height ABS panels and faux windows in the upper corners of the nose give the new Unicorn a more cohesive, modern look (© Phil Russell/Practical Caravan)