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TOPIC: High winds and awnings

High winds and awnings 4 months 14 hours ago #472459

  • HNB
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Hi everyone, just a quick question (sorry if wrong section)

I am currently away in blackpool and have brought my full size awning for this outing (dorema daytona)

Its all pegged down with rock/hardstanding pegs (which was interesting to get in the hardstanding with my rubber mallet lol)

Anyways, my question is, what wind speeds would this be stable at?

I dont have my storm straps or poles on atm but was going to put them on this morning.

I had an incident this morning with centre pole popping out but that was my own fault as i had not screwed it tight enough.

I was going to take it down saturday evening ready for departure sunday morning anyways so maybe a day earlier might be better and safer with winds due to hit 50-60 they claim.

Thanks in advance...

H
Last Edit: 4 months 14 hours ago by HNB.
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High winds and awnings 4 months 14 hours ago #472460

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Or maybe i should of asked, at what speeds are they safe to stay upto?

But im sure you get what i mean :blush:
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High winds and awnings 4 months 13 hours ago #472462

  • otherclive
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Mine withstood storm force in land in Cornwall a couple of New Years back. But it had its large storm straps in place, additional guys and some protection from the caravan.

If I were you I would take it down while you can.
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High winds and awnings 4 months 13 hours ago #472464

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You don’t say what make and poles you have. My Kampa air collapsed in average winds yet the Isabella with carbon fibre poles and internal storm straps has withstood some pretty serious winds.
Why take a chance and expose your awning to damage. I’d take it down now why the weather is fine. No awning manufacturer will guarantee maximum wind ratings. Too many variables like gusts.
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High winds and awnings 4 months 13 hours ago #472466

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Thanks for replies...its steel poles. Im about to put storm strap and the extra internal storm poles on whilst im out during the day, luckily winds are mild during day.

So come tea time i shall take it down i think whilst weather looks to be at its calmest.

I have noticed on the site the wibd has claimed a victim, a porch awning, sides and front up but roof ripped off from caravan side and just flapping :(
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High winds and awnings 4 months 12 hours ago #472477

  • Guzzilazz
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We were at Sennen Cove CCC site for a week at the end of June, and there was an easterly gale forecast. As a sailor, the number of awnings left to their own devices amazed me, especially as the forecast was for gusts of over 50 kts. The wardens worked their butts off to try and sort it all out whilst people were off site, but to me it was the epitome of irresponsibility to leave the awning out in that weather. Several were damaged beyond repair
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High winds and awnings 4 months 10 hours ago #472484

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Its all pegged down with rock/hardstanding pegs (which was interesting to get in the hardstanding with my rubber mallet lol)

Ill bet it was, I always carry a lump hammer, it persuades the pegs to go in easier.

As for your question regarding what wind speeds your awning will take, its akin to "how long is a piece of string" as there are so many variables, gust speeds, constand speed, direction its hitting the awning etc etc, letting alone the competence of the person that erected the awning in the first place. Type of pegs, how well they are holding, type of poles, storm straps etc.

Many people take their awning down if very high winds are expected, but the trick of course is to get it down before they arrive. My awnings have withstood some horrendous gales when all about me have had problems, and touch wood, I havent had any damage yet, except for in the early days trying to erect the awning in a gale.

In a nutshell, an awning will withstand some pretty high winds if it has been erected properly but nobody can give you a precise wind speed. If the pegs hold and the poles dont break, you should be OK. My feelings are that if its hitting the awning full face, its better as the poles are bracing against the caravan, personally Im more twitchy of it when its hitting the end panels.
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Last Edit: 4 months 4 hours ago by Thingy.
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High winds and awnings 4 months 2 hours ago #472520

  • RayS
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Rock pegs suit most terrains so you don't need any other type. In addition to the lump hammer ( 4lb) take a claw hammer as well. This is good to start the pegs and much better than the lump hammer at getting them out again. Put a block of wood under the head for better leverage.
Then use a tie-down strap which goes right across the front of the awning, not just a strap at each side.. Put a couple of twists in this over the awning or it will slap the top of the awning quite noisily Use some good big hooked spikes driven into the ground about 45 degrees from the line of the awning with a spring at at least one of the ends.
This should be good for 50mph+ - at least it was for me in the days I used a full awning.

Ray S . 
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High winds and awnings 4 months 48 minutes ago #472543

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Sitting in a park just North of Aberystwyth on the windy coast and people around me have advised I should take my Suncamp canopy down because gale force winds are expected.. Now let me tell you this canopy withstood gale force in Cornwall once and the weak spot pegs have been replaced with longer ones. So after a bottle of wine I will sleep like a log tonight and in the morning if it is not still in place I will review weak pegging and try again!. Problem is there are such long waits between gales each time I almost have to start again not remembering the last event clearly. I told my 10 year old grandson who is with us that if the van takes off during the night we will be like Mary Poppins where we will be flying over the meadows waving from the windows as we go.
Reborn caravanner !
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High winds and awnings 3 months 4 weeks ago #472554

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Rock pegs suit most terrains so you don't need any other type.

Not so sure I fully agree with that Ray, I find plastic pegs work better on grass pitches, unless its very stoney underneath.
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