Niall Hampton
Editor

See other News articles filed in ‘Caravans’ written by Niall Hampton
   
Coachman is big on traditional appeal. As such, its products appeal to those with more conservative tastes who aren’t worried about carrying an extra few kilos or spending an extra few hundred pounds to get the quality they want. It realises however that the sort of customer they attract is the older more established caravanner and it has decided it needs to freshen up its image to appeal to newcomers and younger caravanners, without upsetting its loyal customer base. It’s a tough line to walk, but the 2011 Amara looks in good shape.

Coachman is big on traditional appeal. As such, its products appeal to those with more conservative tastes who aren’t worried about carrying an extra few kilos or spending an extra few hundred pounds to get the quality they want. It realises however that the sort of customer they attract is the older more established caravanner and it has decided it needs to freshen up its image to appeal to newcomers and younger caravanners, without upsetting its loyal customer base. It’s a tough line to walk, but the 2011 Amara looks in good shape.

 

In terms of layouts, a new 655/6 twin-dinette twin-axle comes into the range, meaning nine models in total. The new Amara has bolder exterior graphics, sharp looking front and rear body panels and stylish grey wheels and detailing on the outside, making this the most contemporary looking Coachman in memory. Side-exiting waste pipes are new too, as is a lined wet locker for most models.

 

Inside, Amara gets more headroom, new locker doors, LED lights, new soft furnishings and a redesigned chest of drawers, thanks to that new front bed arrangement. Rear washroom models get a reworked design while most models get the electric flush toilet, new wash basins and shower cubicles. A larger digital control fridge and Pioneer CD/MP3 player finish the interior upgrades.

 

One innovation Coachman has introduced is a pull-out bed base in the front lounges. It pulls out from the offside seat bench across to meet the nearside seat and do away with the need for slats running out from under the centre chest. Making up the bed in a 2011 Coachman takes little more than 20 seconds, but with no chance of the slats dropping though, this could be the sort of thing that makes caravanners consider ditching a fixed bed.

 

Prices and weights are not yet confirmed

 

Verdict

Big changes for Amara are a complete success. All-new interiors and sharp exteriors should help Coachman attract the younger buyers it craves

Share with friends

Follow us on

Most recent caravan reviews

The Practical Caravan Swift Elegance 530 review – 1 - Its 1661kg MTPLM means the 2017 Swift Elegance 530 isn't light, but it's also heavy on luxury which ups its appeal (© Practical Caravan)
The Practical Caravan Elddis Crusader Zephyr review – 1 - The exterior colour is called 'Champagne', but it is really a heathery brown, differentiating it from the blue of its Compass Camino 660 sister van (© Peter Baber/Practical Caravan)
The Practical Caravan Lunar Lexon 590 review – 1 - Flush-fitting windows, the sunroof, alloy wheels and the cantilever-action gas locker door all add a touch of class to the 590 (© Practical Caravan)
The Practical Caravan Sprite Quattro DD review – 1 - This twin-axle from the 2017 range of Sprite caravans has an MTPLM of 1624kg (© Andy Jenkinson/Practical Caravan)
The Practical Caravan Bailey Pursuit 560-5 review – 1 - The single front window may look budget-style to some, but we like the uncluttered view it provides from inside the van (© Practical Caravan)
The Practical Caravan Compass Capiro 550 review – 1 - The new-for-2017 Compass Capiro 550 has a 1467kg MTPLM (© Practical Caravan)