Nick Harding

See other awning reviews written by Nick Harding

At first glance you could be forgiven for thinking that this top-of-the range inflatable is a full awning – find out more in our Westfield Omega 400 review

Overview

Whatever you think about inflatable caravan awnings, they’re certainly helping to redefine a sector that was previously neatly divided between porch or full.

While a unit such as this top-of-the-range Omega from Westfield is technically a porch awning, from almost any angle it looks like a traditional full design.

And that’s exactly what it aims to be. Indeed, this awning is so big that it comes with its own wheelie bag!

But that’s sensible thinking – the bag is really some 33% bigger than the awning could be, making it that much easier to pack away, especially when the weather conditions aren’t perfect.

All of the main panels zip out, too, which can be a big help when making that initial attachment to the awning rail.

The AAS (Advanced Air System), as Westfield likes to call it, offers the choice of single- or multi-point inflation and deflation. It includes one beam across the front and three roof examples.

For 2017, the Omega comes with a bigger hand pump as standard; there’s said to be a new electric-pump option not far off.

But it’s not all about inflatable beams here: also supplied are rear upright metal poles, a single veranda pole and a storm-leg pole at the front – the latter gives that bit of extra stability when the panels are zipped out.

Also, the front canopy has a glassfibre support pole – although you need to be tall to put it in when the whole unit is fully up.

If you want even more space – or bedrooms – you can add an annex option to either or both sides.

The main fabric is called HydroTech XT Pro, and it’s a particularly strong 300D polyester with a 6000mm hydrostatic head, which means it’s very waterproof.

More significant is the way that this material is constructed, with each thread dyed before it’s woven. This means that the overall colour is more dense and, in theory at least, there is less chance of it fading over time.

There’s a lot of window space here, which of course helps to open up the interior, too.

Add in features such as the full ventilation at the windows, permanent ventilation at the front, additional polyurethane-coated patches at key stress points, plus a mud wall that can be pegged outside or inside, and it really does make an awning that’s a bit special.

The official price may be £1199, but, as usual, shopping around should pay dividends – we reckon you should be aiming to get a Westfield Omega 400 for less than £1000.

This awning weighs 32.5kg, has a 116cm x 43cm x 40cm pack size, is 400cm wide and 260cm deep, and has a 235-250cm fixing height.

Optional extras available are as follows: an annex (£250), an annex inner tent (£59), breathable flooring (£29), an LED light (£50) and an LED strip (£60).

Verdict

Looking at caravan awnings? There are some excellent features on this one – and if you can find a deal on the price, it shouldn’t break the bank, either.

Conclusion

Pros

  • It’s your choice here, of single- or multi-point inflation and deflation

Cons

  • It’s a hefty canvas to move about if you leave all the panels in
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