Nick Harding

See other awning reviews written by Nick Harding

Check out this newcomer to the awning market! If you haven’t already heard of Bailey’s Prima, you will soon – it’s a porch awning that makes a lot of sense

Overview

It might ring a bell, but it probably still needs an introduction – Prima is the name that Bailey is using to herald a whole range of accessories that are heading your way.

And that includes the inflatable porch awning you see here.

It’s still very much a new venture… and a pretty exciting one, it has to be said.

That doesn’t mean that Primas are only suitable for Bailey caravans: we fitted this review model to a Swift Challenger.

The 390 is the larger of two variants – there’s also the 260 – and, at 29kg, the 390 is actually on the lighter side of such awnings.

It doesn’t lose out on features, though. ‘Flexi-inflation’ is the term for how the thing is inflated, with interconnecting valves marked in red.

There’s an inflation point on each of the four main poles, where you can attach the pump, and you can inflate the whole awning from any one of them. The valve system is derived from the kite industry.

The grey and black main colouring is very much a la mode, while the straps for the guylines are luminous.

The fabric is a 300D Oxford polyester with a 3000mm hydrostatic head rating – that’s an official measure of how waterproof you can expect it to be.

It’s acceptable, but not the highest figure in the class.

As an alternative, you can also order your Prima with a Ripstop fabric.

You’ll notice a pronounced curve to the Prima, so standing height at the trio of front access points isn’t as high as some units can provide. Those three panels are all removable and come with roll-up curtains.

There’s no chance of tripping up in the doorways, either, thanks to the facility to peg the flooring sections flat – most awnings have this, but it’s worth looking out for, especially if you take wheeled items such as bikes on tour.

Overhead, toggles are supplied for the optional roof lining: it’s good for helping with ventilation as well as ameliorating some of the effect of the sun on the fabric.

Not that the Prima lacks ventilation. The wide side door panels are half-mesh and, again, can be removed altogether.

They also allow for the optional annexe on either or both sides.

Additional ventilation – always more of an issue with an inflatable awning – is via top-corner vents.

Everything else you see here is included in the price, including the (slightly basic) draught skirt, and rear poles to keep the awning flush to your caravan.

Options available include an annexe (£149.99), an annexe inner (£49.99) and a roof lining (£34.99).

This awning weighs 29kg, is 390cm wide and 260cm deep, has a fixing height of up to 240cm, and a pack size of 110cm x 55cm.

Verdict

This is a very interesting new inflatable awning proposition, thanks to the Bailey connection.

The Prima Deluxe keeps things simple but effective. And it definitely looks good value.

Conclusion

Pros

  • Five-way access (two side and three front doors) means getting in and out couldn’t be easier
  • It's competitively priced
  • A draught skirt and rear poles are included
  • The side doors are wide
  • It uses a one-point inflation system

Cons

  • The hydrostatic head is only rated at 3000mm
  • That standard draught skirt is a little basic
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