Kate Taylor
Digital Content Manager

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Practical Caravan's experts review the Compass Rallye 574 to find out if this is a real return to form

Overview

The news that Elddis would be resurrecting Compass for 2014 – some four years after it discontinued the brand – certainly came out of the blue.

Three ranges were launched, the entry-level Corona, the mid-market Omega and the upmarket Rallye, giving a total of 12 new models, all featuring layouts that will be popular with buyers. The Compass Rallye 574 offers a premium-package interpretation of the fashionable fixed twin-single-beds floor plan.

All Compass caravans use Al-Ko chassis and running gear. This differentiates them from Elddis products, which run on BPW.

Pitching and setting up

The Rallye 574 has Al-Ko’s ATC anti-snaking system as standard. Alloy wheels, a colour-coded awning rail and a wide gas locker all feature, as do external gas and electrical points.

An LED awning light sits atop a two-piece caravan door. Smart blue and grey graphics contrast well with the black colour scheme of the front of the caravan.

Lounge

Elddis may not have rushed to include sunroofs in its caravans, but the Rallye joins the upmarket Crusader range in sporting them for this season. A cream-coloured surround wraps around the sunroof and extends rearwards to frame the rooflight. Daylight positively floods in thanks to all the windows, so the lounge – with its light-coloured cabinetwork – will never feel dingy.

The parallel seats are firm and comfortable, with pronounced knee rolls. Between them, a centre chest has two drawers at knee height, and an extendable top that’s just right for placing your drinks and snacks.

For more formal entertaining there’s a drinks cabinet in the space above the nearside dresser. You will also find a TV point here.

Kitchen

With a dual-fuel hob for maximum flexibility, as well as a microwave, separate oven/grill and a 113-litre fridge, there’s everything that caravanning cooks could need to entertain in the Compass Rallye 574.

A rectangular sink sits above the fridge. In addition, the work surface to the left of the sink can be extended via a pull-out flap.

Washroom

The end washroom follows a familiar configuration, with a cassette toilet in the offside corner and a shower cubicle at the opposite end. In between sit a vanity unit with a wide sink, a half-length mirror and a toothbrush holder. A towel rail is positioned above the Alde heating vents.

The washroom doesn’t seem particularly cramped. We found there is good room to move around and everything feels as though it’s in the right place.

Beds

The fixed twin single beds are the unique selling point of this floor plan, as they offer unimpeded access to the washroom.

The 574’s interpretation of the layout is a good one – the washroom door seems quite narrow, presumably to increase the width of each bed. Up front in the lounge, the parallel seats convert easily into a spacious double bed.

Storage

The front sunroof means that the lounge has to forego a pair of overhead lockers, but there are still two on each side. Another two overhead lockers can be found in the kitchen, and a cupboard sits to the right of the oven.

Opposite, a half-length wardrobe is located above further cupboard space, and there are three overhead lockers (with handles, rather than positive catches) situated over both of the twin single beds. The beds raise on gas struts to reveal storage beneath – this can also be accessed via locker doors on the side of the tourer.

Technical specs

Berth4
MiRO1516kg
Payload154kg
MTPLM1670kg
Interior length5.8m
Shipping length7.42m
Width2.3m
Height2.7m
Awning size10.3cm

Verdict

In terms of specification, the four-berth Compass Rallye 574 goes head-to-head with some illustrious rivals (such as the Bailey Unicorn II Cadiz, Lunar Clubman SB and Swift Conqueror 565) and more than holds its own.

It looks sharp inside and out, is well equipped and good value for money, too. Buyers get the benefits of Elddis’s SoLiD construction technique, plus a 10-year bodyshell integrity warranty. The 574 is a great return to form from Compass.

Conclusion

Pros

  • Great looks
  • It comes with a good kit list – including a front sunroof
  • It has a keen price at launch
  • 10-year bodyshell integrity warranty

Cons

  • Does it look distinctive?
  • The sunroof means it loses some overhead storage space
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