Welcome, Guest

TOPIC: Torqueing and Checking Wheel Bolts.

Torqueing and Checking Wheel Bolts. 7 months 1 week ago #449606

  • Dustydog
  • Dustydog's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Platinum Boarder
  • Posts: 10294
  • Thank you received: 935
Vic,
You raise a very interesting point. When we were young we couldn’t afford torque wrenches.
The tyre fitters in those days taught us to tighten, all nuts FT! We never lost a wheel but obviously technology and design have moved on considerably.
It now raises the question when using the OME tools how do you tighten the spare :unsure:
FT or Murder Tight perhaps :whistle:
Sir Dustydog (BAR) TS .Woosie Round Table
Properly trained, man can be dog's best friend.
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Torqueing and Checking Wheel Bolts. 7 months 1 week ago #449609

  • EH52ARH
  • EH52ARH's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Platinum Boarder
  • Hutch.
  • Posts: 3999
  • Thank you received: 778
Dustydog wrote:
Vic,
You raise a very interesting point. When we were young we couldn’t afford torque wrenches.
The tyre fitters in those days taught us to tighten, all nuts FT! We never lost a wheel but obviously technology and design have moved on considerably.
It now raises the question when using the OME tools how do you tighten the spare :unsure:
FT or Murder Tight perhaps :whistle:

Dusty D, I think the Majority of people call the Breakdown outfit they are with, more to the point though , How would you get the wheel nuts/ bolts Off with Original equipment tools.
Hutch
Sir Were-Rabbit
Sante Fe 2014, tugging a Coachman 560 VIP. 2013.
Rural Milton Keynes
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Torqueing and Checking Wheel Bolts. 7 months 1 week ago #449612

  • Dustydog
  • Dustydog's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Platinum Boarder
  • Posts: 10294
  • Thank you received: 935
EH52ARH wrote:
Dustydog wrote:
Vic,
You raise a very interesting point. When we were young we couldn’t afford torque wrenches.
The tyre fitters in those days taught us to tighten, all nuts FT! We never lost a wheel but obviously technology and design have moved on considerably.
It now raises the question when using the OME tools how do you tighten the spare :unsure:
FT or Murder Tight perhaps :whistle:

Dusty D, I think the Majority of people call the Breakdown outfit they are with, more to the point though , How would you get the wheel nuts/ bolts Off with Original equipment tools.
:woohoo: :blink:
Sir Dustydog (BAR) TS .Woosie Round Table
Properly trained, man can be dog's best friend.
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Torqueing and Checking Wheel Bolts. 7 months 1 week ago #449614

  • Parksy
  • Parksy's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Moderator
  • Retired
  • Posts: 9653
  • Thank you received: 1017
Around 18 months ago I changed all four tyres on the caravan because they'd passed the age where they would be safe to use.
I bought the tyres from 'Tyres on the Drive', one of the many mobile tyre sales and fitting services accessible via the internet.
On the appointed day the fitter duly changed the tyres and I then asked for my wheels to be (re) balanced.
The tyre fitter seemed very surprised that I wanted the caravan wheels balanced, he said that it was something that he'd never been asked for before and that caravan wheel balancing was rare in his experience.
Of course I insisted in spite of the fitters protestations, and although I regularly check the alloy wheel stud torques with the torque wrench that lives in the tug the wheel studs are always ok.
I wonder if the fitter was trying to avoid the extra work or if caravan owners genuinely don't bother with wheel balancing and if this could loosen the wheel nuts or studs?
Contact email address:

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Torqueing and Checking Wheel Bolts. 7 months 1 week ago #449616

  • Craigyoung
  • Craigyoung's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Platinum Boarder
  • Happy Touring
  • Posts: 2246
  • Thank you received: 470
Someone says on a previous post that they don't hear of it happening overseas on the continent but the roads over here are crap, the roads over there are superb for driving on , lovely tarmac motorways , no pot holes
Ford Kuga 2.o Tdi & a Sprite Major 6TD

Sir Crying -
Will possibly get to
the round table some day !!
Sorry !!
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Torqueing and Checking Wheel Bolts. 7 months 1 week ago #449620

  • Lutz
  • Lutz's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Platinum Boarder
  • Posts: 8800
  • Thank you received: 67
Craigyoung wrote:
Someone says on a previous post that they don't hear of it happening overseas on the continent but the roads over here are crap, the roads over there are superb for driving on , lovely tarmac motorways , no pot holes

I have not seen any evidence that there is a direct link between the condition of the roads and the likelihood of a wheel falling off. I have done many miles with my Continental caravan in the UK and on unsurfaced roads elsewhere and have always returned home safely. Besides, wheels coming off does not seem to be a problem across the board. It appears to be most frequent with certain models.
BMW X4 3.0d
Dethleffs Beduin 545V
Last Edit: 7 months 1 week ago by Lutz.
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Torqueing and Checking Wheel Bolts. 7 months 1 week ago #449625

  • Brasso530
  • Brasso530's Avatar
  • Online
  • Gold Boarder
  • Posts: 192
  • Thank you received: 70
Vic,
You raise a very interesting point. When we were young we couldn’t afford torque wrenches.
The tyre fitters in those days taught us to tighten, all nuts FT! We never lost a wheel but obviously technology and design have moved on considerably.
It now raises the question when using the OME tools how do you tighten the spare :unsure:
FT or Murder Tight perhaps :whistle:
When I was an apprentice,tight meant 1/4 of a turn before it snapped :lol: :whistle:
2014 Kuga 2ltr tdi,2014 explore 530
Last Edit: 7 months 1 week ago by Brasso530. Reason: Sorry,only just realised,didn't put a box around quote,just pasted it.
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Torqueing and Checking Wheel Bolts. 7 months 1 week ago #449630

  • Anseo
  • Anseo's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Platinum Boarder
  • Posts: 1058
  • Thank you received: 309
I note VicMallows comment on "tighten intuitively", and I agree that there is a lot going for this approach.

However, although I am handy with the spanners now, I do recall the rather long learning curve where I went through the 'tighten until spins freely' phase.

All in all, a torque wrench is useful for removing some of the guesswork; with the caveat that hardly anyone will have a torque wrench re-calibrated after the initial purchase.

Youtube has some videos on re-calibration that are useful.
Sir Haggis

Bailey Pegasus GT65 Ancona (year-2013)
Last Edit: 7 months 1 week ago by Anseo.
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Torqueing and Checking Wheel Bolts. 7 months 1 week ago #449635

  • ProfJohnL
  • ProfJohnL's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Platinum Boarder
  • Posts: 11377
  • Thank you received: 1179
I agree with Vic that alloy wheels may be part of the problem. Compared to steel, alloy is relatively malleable meaning it can be formed and shaped more easily - its requires less force to leave a permanent mark. so any additional force on the wheel induced by vibrations allows the nut or bolt to bruise the alloy, this could permanently reduce the thickness of the alloy being clamped, and that will reduce the tension in the fixing. Then as I previously postulated there is more potential for the nuts to work loose.

It could also be the case as Lutz points out that caravan manufacturers own wheel designs may not be as thoroughly tested as those supplied by the trailer manufacture.

We have to work with what we have, so its up to drivers to make the necessary checks.
Unless I use quotes, All advice and opinions given are my own and are given in good faith. Never act on anything you read on a forum unless you can validate and verify its source and content.
The administrator has disabled public write access.
The following user(s) said Thank You: otherclive

Torqueing and Checking Wheel Bolts. 7 months 1 week ago #449647

  • Gafferbill
  • Gafferbill's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Platinum Boarder
  • Keep active be happy and stay safe
  • Posts: 2978
  • Thank you received: 437
.....for me loose caravan wheels are solely down to human failure to carry out due diligence.

That is a failure to fit the wheel correctly after removal and a failure to recheck the wheel fastenings for correct tightness after the initial bedding in mileage.
It has long been known that best workshop practice is for a fitter to torque the fastenings to the manufacturers settings and then to get a second fitter to recheck the settings.
Then on hand over of the vehicle to the user........ the user is told of the importance of checking for tightness after a set number of miles.

It would be simple engineering to fit wheel fastenings that could not come undone, so ask yourself why 99.99% of all wheel fastenings since their invention do not have a locking mechanism.
The reason is that they are not needed provided the human carries out the correct procedure.
(Sir) Baldrick WC......I have a cunning plan!
  GB West Sussex
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Most recent caravan reviews

Sprite Super Quattro FB - The new 8ft-wide Sprite Super Quattro FB has lots of space for a family on tour, but how much difference does that extra width really make? (© Practical Caravan)
Coachman VIP 460 2019 - The Coachman VIP 460 is an extended two-berth with lots of space for a couple to tour in comfort (© Practical Caravan)
2019 Compass Capiro 462 - The Capiro 462 has a smart, contemporary exterior, ATC fitted as standard and a large front gas locker for extra storage (© Practical Caravan)
Bailey Phoenix 420 - The exterior of the new Phoenix is smartly finished in white GRP, with understated graphics (© Practical Caravan)