Rory White

See other Blog articles filed in ‘Tow cars’ written by Rory White
   
We tow-tested Nissan's X-Trail way back in February 2007, and then we thought it was a 4/5 car, showing that '4x4s needn't be big and thirsty tow cars'.

The benefits of choosing a smaller off-roader are seen most vividly when unhitched, the X-Trail proving to be a fun drive but practical with a huge boot space

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We tow-tested Nissan's X-Trail way back in February 2007, and then we thought it was a 4/5 car, showing that '4x4s needn't be big and thirsty tow cars'.

 

The benefits of choosing a smaller off-roader are seen most vividly when unhitched, the X-Trail proving to be a fun drive but practical with a huge boot space

 

Now for 2010, Nissan have revised the X-Trail, currently on sale for delivery in October.

 

The main changes lie with fuel efficiency and CO2 emissions, interesting for suits because tax bands are altered for the better, and interesting for caravanners because less fuel will get you further.

 

The 173PS 2.0-litre dCi diesel manual will now emit just 168g/km CO2, a drop of 30g/km or 15%. Fuel efficiency rises for 38.2mpg to 44.1mpg too.

 

Its a similar story with the 150PS automatic variation, with CO2 down from 216g/km to 188g/km and efficiency up from 34.9mpg to 39.8mpg.

 

Available in two specification grades, Acenta and Tekna, Nissan are keen to stress that an Acenta, priced at £23,995 on the road, comes in at £685 less than an equivalent Honda CR-V and £1000 less than the same Land Rover Freelander.

 

All this green treatment hasn't damaged the car's towing ability thankfully, still able to haul 2,200kg with 360NM of torque. 60mph is reached in 10 seconds from standstill.

 

rory@practicalcaravan.com

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