Laura Suarez
Visual Designer & Frontend developer

See other accessory reviews written by Laura Suarez

NOT A GREAT deal of thought goes into the purchase of the average caravan step, but the wrong one can cause problems. Poor quality steps can be unstable or slippery and it's easy to injure yourself.

Overview

The MGI Giant Plastic Step makes getting in and out of your caravan very easy. It is tall, putting you 370mm (14 and a half inches) off the ground. A standard caravan step is typically about two thirds of that height. The Giant Step is a double step, but both step heights are lower than a standard caravan step. It is ideal for kids or for those with mobility issues who find the standard climb a bit of a struggle.

So the Giant Step is high but it is also wide-based. This makes it very sturdy. Even if you stand on the outside edge of the large tread area, it will not tip up. The actual step area is huge too. It has ridges moulded onto the face to minimise the chances of slipping if you step on or off it with wet shoes or boots.

Verdict

Recommended pricing for the British-made MGI Giant Double Step puts it close to £25 but by shopping around, you will cleave that cost to under £20 making it look very good value.   

For seasonal pitches or those who struggle with the step up into their tourer, the MGI Giant Step is money well spent. For those who don't need the extra height, a more compact, conventional step will suffice. 

Conclusion

Pros

  • Recommended pricing for the British-made MGI Giant Double Step puts it close to £25
  • Conventional step will suffice
  • Giant Step is money well spent

Cons

  • You will cleave that cost to under £20 making it look very good value
Share with friends

Follow us on

Most recent caravan reviews

The Practical Caravan Elddis Crusader Zephyr review – 1 - The exterior colour is called 'Champagne', but it is really a heathery brown, differentiating it from the blue of its Compass Camino 660 sister van (© Peter Baber/Practical Caravan)
The Practical Caravan Lunar Lexon 590 review – 1 - Flush-fitting windows, the sunroof, alloy wheels and the cantilever-action gas locker door all add a touch of class to the 590 (© Practical Caravan)
The Practical Caravan Sprite Quattro DD review – 1 - This twin-axle from the 2017 range of Sprite caravans has an MTPLM of 1624kg (© Andy Jenkinson/Practical Caravan)
The Practical Caravan Bailey Pursuit 560-5 review – 1 - The single front window may look budget-style to some, but we like the uncluttered view it provides from inside the van (© Practical Caravan)
The Practical Caravan Compass Capiro 550 review – 1 - The new-for-2017 Compass Capiro 550 has a 1467kg MTPLM (© Practical Caravan)
The Practical Caravan Sterling Eccles 510 review – 1 - Sharp graphics and a carbonfibre-effect gas-locker lid give the Sterling a unique personality that distances it from its Swift Challenger sibling (© Practical Caravan)