Lunar is a company renowned for its ability to produce lightweight caravans. The upmarket Clubman range is no exception, despite its impressive specification. In the last two seasons its appeal may have been muted by comparison with new generation models from Bailey, Elddis and Swift Group, but now Lunar has joined the party with a striking new design for its Lexon, Clubman and Delta ranges.
For several years tourer sales have been dominated by fixed bed layouts, but twin and island double beds, which allow both occupants easy access, have only recently become popular. Lunar’s Clubman SI is a 5.8m-long single axle van. At £21,195, it’s the only model in its price bracket with a transverse island double bed and end washroom.

Pitching and setting up

The Clubman’s new full-height front is striking, its upward sweep accentuated by tall windows with a matching curvature. Surprisingly, it has no sunroof: a feature which becomes ever more popular as Bailey and Swift Group extend their interpretations of it to lower priced ranges. The wide gas compartment door is superb, its hinge action making access really easy.
The Al-Ko chassis comes equipped with ATC stability control, AKS stabiliser, shock-absorbers, Secure wheel lock and heavy duty corner steadies. As you’ll see in the equipment list, exterior specification continues at a high level. There’s even hidden illumination behind the grab handles, and the awning light is neatly housed in moulding which will deflect water run-off.
The electric power unit and 12-volt fuse board are combined in an easily accessed unit in a seat front, so setting up on arrival is easy. The Alde radiator heating system is acknowledged to have a longer warm-up time than blown air heating but, when up to temperature, it’s designed to give even, draught-free heat. If your Clubman is already on a pitch, you can even start the heating early with your mobile phone. Short radiators and restricted airflow in the lounge area concern us; it may cause cold spots in sub-zero temperatures but we didn’t have the opportunity to test this.

Lounge

The biggest practical benefit arising from the new front shape is lounging space in the front corners. It’s great to enjoy the best seats in the house without your head pressing into cassette blinds and the extra shelf space is useful. Another body shape bonus is large roof lockers over the front seats, and we applaud Lunar for maximising useful storage by fitting mid shelves throughout. The absence of a front sunroof means there are also two big lockers across the front.
Lighting is comprehensive. In addition to the expected ceiling light and four corner spots, two large corner fittings flood the lounge with ambient light and under-locker LED strips gently illuminate the curtains. TV can be watched on the front chest or the mid-van cupboard, thanks to generous provision of aerial, satellite and power connections.
Lounge seating is luxurious for two and four can sit or dine in comfort. The upholstery specification is high, featuring elaborate armrests and two pairs of scatter cushions. In contrast the curtains look insubstantial but, with smart pleated blinds on all windows, we’d leave the curtains in their ties.

Kitchen

This type of layout allows plenty of kitchen space and Lunar has taken advantage. The base unit has a Dometic 8-Series 100-litre fridge and a full width oven and grill. There’s still room for a 30cm-wide slide-out basket unit and storage for the dining table. Generous worktop space is maximised by using a removable drainer. Above there are three separate cupboards with provision for large and small items and crockery. Illumination comes from a ceiling fitting and LED strips. Opposite the kitchen are more cupboards and a microwave oven at a welcome low level.

Washroom

This is a well-equipped, spacious washroom with the latest ceramic bowl Dometic toilet, a good sized, lined shower cubicle and heating from a domestic–type radiator. Perhaps the washbasin could be a little bigger and we would have liked more work surface for toiletries. Taps and fittings are smart and modern. An opening window and rooflight ensure plenty of natural light and ventilation, and lighting upholds the standard set by the rest of the van.

Beds

The main double bed is 1.83m long. That’s 7.5cm shorter than a standard domestic bed, so it won’t suit taller people. Thanks to the Clubman’s 2.28m overall width, there’s room to easily pass the double bed en route to the washroom.
The deep, pocket-sprung mattress should ensure a comfortable night’s sleep and there are conveniently placed reading lights and shelves. There’s even a third TV point with a multi-position bracket opposite the bed and two CD/radio speakers.
The front seating converts to a double bed supported on pull-out slats. With the drawer chest in place it measures 2.11m x 1.12m, but increases to 2.11m x 1.52m with the chest in the car or awning.

Storage

Outside and inside storage are both excellent. The gas compartment’s full width is exposed by the wide door, there’s a wet locker in front of the entrance door and, again on the awning side, a door into the double bed base. Inside the van, the mattress lifts easily on twin gas struts to reveal a cavernous, clutter-free space. There’s storage space under the front seats which is accessed through full length front flaps or well-supported seat bases.
Roof lockers all around the van are generous for four occupants’ clothes and effects and hanging is provided by wardrobes each side of the double bed.

Technical specs

Berth4
MiRO1340kg
Payload155kg
MTPLM1495kg
Interior length5.79m
Shipping length7.34m
Width2.28m
Height2.65m
Awning size1025cm

Verdict

The new Clubman range enjoys a comprehensive specification with lots of extra features to surprise and delight a new owner, like the many lighting details, the external shower and automatic gas bottle changeover. The SI model has a great kitchen and washroom and impressive storage throughout. The layout works very well provided you’re not too tall for the bed and it is the only one of its kind in this price range. Lunar’s new body shell is a huge improvement on the outgoing one, but it doesn’t quite have the showroom appeal of a Swift Conqueror or the construction credentials of a Bailey Unicorn. Importantly however, it is blessed with Lunar lightness, and that will put it at the top of many buyers’ shortlists.

Conclusion

Pros

  • Big kitchen with low microwave, comprehensive kit list and MTPLM under 1500kg

Cons

  • Double bed only 1.83m (6ft) long, potential cold spots in lounge and no front sunroof
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